Treasure Enterprises of Australia

Australia's Oldest & Largest Supplier of Gold Prospecting and Treasure Hunting Equipment   (Established 1976)

We are Australia's leading professionals for Internet and Mail Orders

Email:      sildale@yahoo.com

Postal address:   P.O. Box 383, Archerfield, Brisbane, Queensland, 4108, Australia


Home ] SITE MAP / PAGE INDEX ] OUR CONTACT DETAILS ] HOW TO ORDER ] WEB SUPER SPECIALS ] MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS ] AUSTRALIANA BOOKS & LOCAL HISTORY BOOKS - Plus many other categories - New & Secondhand ] GEOLOGICAL, PROSPECTING & TREASURE HUNTING BOOKS, REPORTS & MAPS ] METAL DETECTORS - Brands, models & Information ] PROSPECTING EQUIPMENT ] GOLD PROSPECTING LOCATIONS & INFORMATION ] TREASURE HUNTING INFORMATION ] GEM FOSSICKING INFORMATION ] MISCELLANEOUS WEB PAGES ] PHOTO GALLERY ] COMPANY PROFILE ] GEOLOGICAL SPECIMEN SUPPLIES ] SPECIAL ITEMS FOR SALE ]

 

 

AUSTRALIAN TREASURE STORIES

These are some interesting articles, which have been published, in various Australian newspapers over the years. Some of these leads could be worth following up!

If you happen to find others of interest, please let us know and we will add them to this web page.

 

BENDIGO (Victoria)

An old prospector, Antanio Dambrogio, a native of Switzerland, aged 81 years, was found unconscious in his hut, close to Kangaroo Flat railway Station on Wednesday and died soon after removal to the Bendigo Hospital. He had resided for over 50 years in an old hut, and lived the life of a hermit. Police-constable Earnshaw, on making a search of the hut, found, concealed in a stone jar buried in the ground, bank receipts, of the value of £2,019/5/- and banking and mining shares of about £2,000. Old residents state that Dambrogio was a successful gold-digger in the early days but his wealth was not known, even to his intimate friends. He has no relatives in Australia. A medical examination showed that the old man died from heart failure. Many interesting documents were found but, so far, no will has been discovered.

(THE ARGUS … 2nd June 1917)

TOWNSVILLE (Queensland)

Following the discovery of a gold-bearing stone in peculiar circumstances on the outskirts of Townsville, there is much local excitement on the old Ravenswood goldfield. A car became embedded in a shallow hole, accelerated, and the rear wheel hurled out a stone, which was later found to contain nearly three ounces of gold. It is reported that many of the residents, including women and children, are now busily engaged searching gullies and washing dirt.

(THE ADVERTISER … 3rd January 1933)

ADELAIDE (South Australia)

Pending investigations which may disclose whether the £61 in notes found in a tin partly buried at Somerton is actually part of the £200/8/6 recently stolen from the strongroom of A.G. Healing Ltd, a solicitor is holding the money on behalf of the finder, Brian Adams, aged 7, of St. Anne’s Estate, Somerton. Six five-pond notes, 31 one-pound notes and four two-penny stamps were found in the buried tin. The money taken from Healings also included six five-pound notes and a number of £1 and 10/- notes, several postal notes and eight two-penny stamps. However, as Healings do not know the numbers of the stolen notes, proof that the money found by the boy was part of that, which was stolen, may be difficult.

(THE ADVERTISER … 23rd May 1934)

MUDGEE (New South Wales)

A family passing through Mudgee had a fortunate find. They camped on pipeclay, about 4 miles from Mudgee, and the father started prospecting among the old mine workings, with no results, until his little son, who had been playing on an old mullock heap, scratched the surface and picked up a gold nugget, which was found to weigh 7 ounces. Can you imagine the scene? The boy probably called out "Is this what you’re looking for, Dad?".

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 16th July 1934)

WEDDERBURN (Victoria)

It was reported that a greengrocer at Wedderburn, Mr Albert Smith, had recently unearthed a 75 ounce nugget worth £1,100. The gold was encased in quartz and was found at a depth of 5 feet in Mr Smith’s roadside alluvial claim, right in town, opposite the Presbyterian Church. During the next three days, four new claims were pegged out in Wilson Street, the main thoroughfare in Wedderburn. About 150 yards of Wilson Street had now been pegged. Then came news that a retired farmer, Mr Dave Butterick, and his three sons-in-law, had won nearly £10,000 worth of gold from their backyard mine. Their mining property could not be extended for it was bounded by the local school, the Presbyterian Church and the Bank of Australasia. The Butterick syndicate had been working away quietly at their mine for a considerable period of time but they had been close-mouthed about their success.

(SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 16th March 1950)

WEDDERBURN (Victoria)

Mr Reg Chapman, son-in-law of Mr Dave Butterick, has found a 75 ounce nugget, 8 feet below the surface. Tonight, Albert Smith is digging by lamplight on the opposite side of the road in an attempt to reach the reef before Mr Chapman.

(SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 21st March 1950)

MOLE CREEK (Tasmania)

Seventeen years ago George Howe lost a tin containing banknotes near Mole Creek in the wilds of north-west Tasmania. Yesterday, his son stumbled over the tin while brush cutting. He opened the rusted tin and found two pound notes, mouldy and discoloured. Mr Howe’s son remarked to a fellow scrub-feller when he arrived in the district yesterday morning: "This is where my father lost some notes a long time ago’. A few hours later, he picked up the tin.

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 29TH May 1955)

PERTH (Western Australia)

A shearer has found gold worth more than £300 in an old cupboard he bought for one pound five shillings in 1942. The shearer, Mr Herbert John Harris, 25, of Kewdale, found the gold while breaking up the cupboard to get timber for repair work. He pulled a partition out of the cupboard top and heard a rattle. He undid two screws fastening the ends of the partition and found three hollowed out compartments, each containing gold. Altogether there was about 20 ounces of melted gold wrapped in brown paper.

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 3rd July 1957)

PEAK HILL (New South Wales)

A young golfer searching for a lost ball yesterday found a tin of gold estimated to be worth £300. He is Allan Stain, 20, a shearer, of Peak Hill, who was playing at Peak Hill golf course. Peak Hill, between Parkes and Dubbo, was the scene of one of the State’s biggest gold rushes last century. The golf course is built on the worked-out goldfield area. Stain was practising on his own when he sliced a shot into the rough. After searching for several minutes for the ball, he kicked over a pile of dirt and rock to see whether it was underneath. From the centre of the pile of dirt, a stream of alluvial gold spilled from a badly corroded battered tin. Stain collected the gold, and, while looking around to see if there were more tins hidden in the dirt, found the lost ball. Stain’s father said last night that the gold weighed more than 16 ounces and was worth about £300. He said that he thought the gold had been buried last century by a miner who had either forgotten the hiding place or died before he could recover his hoard.

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 14th December 1957)

PERTH (Western Australia)

Maris Derams, a university student, dug up two glass jars containing £925 under the floor of his parents’ garage. The money is believed to have been buried several years ago.

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 5th March 1959)

BRISBANE (Queensland)

A policeman claimed in the Supreme Court today that he was entitled to keep a £540 gold ingot which he found near the Mount Isa drive-in picture theatre. He is Constable Myles Byrne of Hawthorne Street, Woolloongabba. Byrne appealed against a magistrate’s decision on may 6 in Mt. Isa Court ordering that the ingot be held by the Commonwealth bank until November and its value then be paid into the State Treasury. Mr. Justice Wantstall was told that Byrne found the ingot lying on the ground in an unfenced public exit from the drive-in on August 30, 1957.

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 30th June 1959)

MELBOURNE (Victoria)

Police today traced the owner of treasure trove found buried at Belgrave and solved a 17 year old mystery for 74 year-old Mr Albert White of Footscray. Mr Otto Bakos, of Belgrave, uncovered a rusted milk tin containing £120 in old notes, a gold wedding ring, and a gold engagement ring when digging his garden a week ago. Police enquiries today led to Mr White who tenanted the house until his wife’s death in 1943. He said he had often wondered what happened to the rings. His thrifty Scottish-born wife must have saved the £120 from housekeeping money and buried it, with the rings, for safety. Mr White, who has since remarried, said he would send Mr Bakos ‘a very fine reward’.

(THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD … 17th September 1960)

 

............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

19th December 2006

ANOTHER BIG GOLD NUGGET UNEARTHED IN VICTORIA

Yes ..... the rumour is correct !

A big gold nugget has just been found.

   

Last weekend (16th - 17th December 2006) a large gold nugget weighing 110 oz (or just under 3½ kg) was found just near Maryborough in Victoria.

The "Slugget" as it has been nick-named (as it looks like a slug ... but ... being a nugget).  

The size of the gold nugget is about 8" x 4" and about 2" thick and could be valued up to $200,000 as a specimen.

It was found about a metre deep with a brand new Minelab GPX 4000 metal detector and it is reported that the prospector, a retired Ballarat train driver,  was using an 18" diameter coil.

It was televised on Channel 7  'News' and 'Sunrise' programmes.

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Friday 25th August, 2006

JUNIOR'S LITTLE TREASURE

A demolition worker has found about $20,000 worth of silver bullion bars buried beneath a suburban Perth house.

A New Zealand demolition man known as Junior was tearing up a concrete slab on Tuesday (22nd August) at a site in Como, in Perth's south, when he uncovered some PVC pipes that contained the silver.

Junior took the 11 bars of the metal to his boss, who then took the haul to police later that day. Police believe the silver is worth about $20,000.

Extract from: Brisbane "The Courier Mail"     Friday 25th August 2006. 

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

COPY OF AN EMAIL received

19th April, 2006

From:  Helen May  of  Linton, Victoria 

My name is Helen May, thought I would send you a copy of a photo of my husband Graham, he found this 31 gram nugget with my Bounty Hunter Tracker four, his detector, Minelab 3000 was in for repair, so he had to go with the (Bounty Hunter) Tracker, or sit in the car & watch the rest of us, & we could not believe it, there were four of us there, the other guy who had a 3500 machine, walked away in disgust, but you still can`t get the smile off my Graham`s face, biggest nugget he has ever found, found just three weeks ago.

Thank you

Helen  

                

Also ... Don't forget to read Graham's full story: 'Hunting up a Bounty of Gold' in our    Metal Detecting Stories   page.

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

 

 

Tuesday 7th April 2009

 

RELICS & GOLD NUGGETS UNEARTHED IN NORTH QUEENSLAND FLOODS !

 

      

 

Story and pictures .... courtesy of:

The Courier Mail, Brisbane, Queensland

Tuesday 7th April 2009

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................

 

Tuesday 3rd February 2009

Treasure Hunters find $500 million worth of gold

 

The US firm which claims to have discovered one of the greatest British warships ever lost at sea is seeking "immediate" permission to begin recovering artefacts from the wreck.

Florida-based Odyssey has been embroiled in a legal dispute with the Spanish government, after it recovered a shipwreck with gold and silver coins in 2007 and flew the haul, estimated by some to be worth $US 500 million, back to the United States of America.

It discovered the final resting place of the HMS Victory in the English Channel and notified the British Ministry of Defence as soon as the team concluded it was the man-of-war which sank in a storm in 1744 with a crew of 1150.

The exploration company said it was negotiating a collaboration agreement with the British government, which claims sovereignty over the ship thought to have been the most impressive war vessel of its time.

"The money is not as important as the cultural and historical significance of the discovery. It is a monumental event, not only for Odyssey but for the world," Odyssey's CEO Greg Stemm said.

"It is probably the most significant shipwreck find to date”.

"HMS Victory was the mightiest vessel of the 18th century and the eclectic mix of guns we found on the site will prove essential in further refining our understanding of naval weaponry used during the era," he added.

Odyssey said it feared the wreck was suffering substantial damage from natural erosion and extensive trawler-fishing and its contents could be lost unless they were brought to the surface as soon as possible.

The Victory's archaeological treasures are prized by salvagers because they are believed to include 100 brass cannons, thought to be engraved with dolphins and the monogram of King George II, and a substantial amount of gold and silver.

Odyssey said it found the wreck 100 metres under the English Channel, nearly 100km from the Channel Islands site where the ship was historically believed to have been wrecked in a violent storm.

Reports from the time claim the ship was carrying four tonnes of gold.

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................

13th June 2008

BURKE and WILLS TREASURE FIND

 

As you will see from the photograph below and by using a Minelab GP Metal Detector several artefacts believed to have belonged to the explorers Burke and Wills have been located.

  

Courtesy of "The Courier Mail", Brisbane, Queensland    (Friday 13th June 2008)

....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

10th March 2008

DECIMAL COINS ARE NOW NEARLY WORTH MORE THAN THE METAL USED !

The size and composition of some of Australia's coins could be changed because of the soaring cost of copper and nickel.

For the first time, the metal value of the 5c, 10c and 20 cent coins, which are made of the alloy cupro-nickel, will this year overtake their face values.

The metal content of the 10c, 20c and 50 cent pieces is already worth more than the metal in the $1.00 & $2.00 coins, which are made of aluminium bronze.

The 5 cent coin has a metal cost of 4.89 cents and the 10 cent coin 9.78 cents and the 20 cent coin 19.56 cents. The metal cost of the $1 coin is only 8.3 cents; the $2 coin is only 6.1 cents. (These figures are derived from the Royal Australian Mint contracts made late 2007.)

With copper and nickel prices up about 30%, some new coins will cost more to make than face value.

So ... all of you treasure hunters out there ... hang on to those coins ... don't spend them !

 

.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

end